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  • Writer's pictureWalid Omar

High Cholesterol: A Silent Threat to Your Health

Updated: Jan 29

High cholesterol is a common condition that affects millions of people worldwide. It often goes unnoticed because it doesn't usually cause any symptoms. However, if left untreated, high cholesterol can lead to serious health problems, including heart disease, stroke, and peripheral artery disease. Visit www.myomarmed.com for more Information about Dr. Walid Omar, Board Certified Family Physician and Primary care in St Augustine.

If you or someone you love struggles with managing diabetes, keep reading!



What is Cholesterol?

Cholesterol is a waxy substance that is found naturally in the body. It is essential for many important functions, such as building cell membranes and producing hormones. However, when there is too much cholesterol in the blood, it can build up in the walls of your arteries, forming a hard substance called plaque. This plaque can narrow or block your arteries, restricting blood flow to your organs.


What Causes High Cholesterol?

There are many factors that can contribute to high cholesterol, including:

  • Lifestyle factors: These include unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, smoking, and excessive alcohol consumption.

  • Genetics: Some people are genetically predisposed to having high cholesterol.

  • Certain medical conditions: Certain medical conditions, such as hypothyroidism and kidney disease, can also cause high cholesterol.

What are the Risks of High Cholesterol?

High cholesterol is a major risk factor for several serious health problems, including:

  • Heart disease: High cholesterol is the leading cause of heart disease, which is the leading cause of death worldwide.

  • Stroke: High cholesterol can also increase your risk of stroke, which is a serious condition that can damage your brain.

  • Peripheral artery disease: This condition occurs when plaque builds up in the arteries in your legs and feet, which can lead to pain, cramping, and even amputation.

How is High Cholesterol Diagnosed?

High cholesterol is diagnosed with a simple blood test called a lipid panel. This test measures your levels of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol (bad cholesterol), HDL cholesterol (good cholesterol), and triglycerides.


How is High Cholesterol Treated?

The treatment for high cholesterol will depend on the severity of your condition and your overall health. Lifestyle changes are often the first line of treatment. These may include:

  • Eating a healthy diet: This includes eating plenty of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, and limiting unhealthy fats, such as saturated and trans fats.

  • Exercising regularly: Aim for at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise most days of the week.

  • Losing weight: If you are overweight or obese, losing even a small amount of weight can help lower your cholesterol levels.

  • Quitting smoking: Smoking is a major risk factor for high cholesterol, so quitting is one of the best things you can do for your health.

In addition to lifestyle changes, your doctor may also prescribe medication to help lower your cholesterol levels.



Preventing High Cholesterol

There are several things you can do to help prevent high cholesterol, including:

  • Eating a healthy diet: This is the most important thing you can do to prevent high cholesterol.

  • Exercising regularly: Aim for at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise most days of the week.

  • Maintaining a healthy weight: If you are overweight or obese, losing even a small amount of weight can help lower your cholesterol levels.

  • Not smoking: Smoking is a major risk factor for high cholesterol, so quitting is one of the best things you can do for your health.

Living with High Cholesterol

If you have high cholesterol, it is important to work with your doctor to develop a treatment plan that is right for you. By making lifestyle changes and taking medication as prescribed, you can control your cholesterol levels and reduce your risk of developing serious health problems.


Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)


  • What are the symptoms of high cholesterol? High cholesterol usually does not cause any symptoms. This is why it is so important to get regular blood tests.

  • What is the difference between LDL cholesterol and HDL cholesterol? LDL cholesterol is often called "bad cholesterol" because it can build up in your arteries and increase your risk of heart disease. HDL cholesterol is often called "good cholesterol" because it helps remove cholesterol from your arteries.

  • What can I do to lower my cholesterol levels? The best way to lower your cholesterol levels is to make lifestyle changes, such as eating a healthy diet, exercising regularly, and losing weight. Your doctor may also prescribe medication to help lower your cholesterol levels.

  • Do I need to take medication for high cholesterol? Not everyone with high cholesterol needs to take medication. Dr. Omar will decide whether or not medication is right for you based on your individual risk factors.

  • How do I schedule an appointment with Dr. Omar?


Feel free to use this link to access Dr. Walid Omar's profile on Patient Fusion for more information about his medical practice and services in St. Augustine, Florida.


At Omar Medical, we are here to support you every step of the way in managing your diabetes. Regular blood sugar monitoring, coupled with guidance from Dr. Omar and our dedicated diabetes healthcare providers, can help you achieve better control over your condition.

For more insights on diabetes management and related topics, don't forget to check out our latest informative blogs:


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100 Whetstone Pl, Suite 204
St. Augustine, FL 32086

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